The Opioid Epidemic Hits Small Business; Worksite Awareness Works

Our nation’s penal system isn’t exactly known for innovation. But when it comes to addressing the opioid epidemic, business leaders would be advised to follow Kentucky’s lead, where two dozen county jails have started full-time “therapeutic communities” to treat inmates with opioid addiction. (A New Kind of Jail for the Opioid Age,https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/16/opinion/sunday/opioid-epidemic-kentucky-jails.html?_r=0 )

Emergency rooms and the nation’s prisons aren’t the only places filling up with opioid abusers – offices and factory floors are too. Although 70% of employers are negatively affected by Rx abuse, less than 25% educate workers on prevention. Thirty percent do not provide access to alternative treatments. But unlike the progressive, enlightened approaches seen in Kentucky and elsewhere, corporate America has been slow to adopt innovative programs or approaches in addressing this growing problem.

A 2016 surgeon general’s report  pointed to the efficacy of several worksite programs that raised awareness of Rx misuse and safe alternatives. To date, most workplace focus has been on drug screening and treatment, by which time the pattern of abuse and its negative effects have been become deeply entrenched. Plus, standard drug tests don’t typically screen for prescription drug use.  

“Despite some concerns about the perceived stigma and the fear that exposure can have negative job consequences, the workplace can be an effective “locus” to reach, engage and inform employees around an issue that affects more a good portion of the workforce – either directly or indirectly,” said Dr. Joel Bennett, CEO of OWLS, two of whose worksite awareness and prevention programs were cited in the AG report. “Our own studies have found that prevention-focused training programs can de-stigmatize substance abuse prevention (and treatment), lowering barriers for employees needing support and direction.”

If our penal institutions can develop and implement programs that effectively engage and inform inmates, surely business owners can take proactive steps in implementing such programs at the workplace. For more on OWLS, visit organizationalwellness.com. 

 

Content-Marketing: to Be Seen You First Must Be Heard

Writing and optimizing content simply to target search engines is an all-too common SEO “strategy.” And it’s precisely why companies wait and wait for results, only to find little if any meaningful movement in their rankings six months later.

Being “discovered” in today’s overcrowded, intensely competitive online marketplace is no longer just about gaming algorithms or a mysterious bag of SEO tricks. It’s about your reach, your ability to engage, your influence. Which is to say, the quality and strategic distribution of your content — the articles, blog posts, tweets, white papers, and infographics you write, optimize and disseminate to key websites and across social media. In other words, you need to be “heard” before you’re “seen.”   

Keywords vs. Key Concepts

The top search engines use “site quality algorithms,” which move well beyond “quantitative” analysis (i.e., keyword density) and into “qualitative” analysis, privileging content quality and relevance.

Which begs the question: what do we mean by content quality and relevance? For starters, communications that are:

  • Non promotional
  • Relevant
  • Timely
  • Well-reasoned

In sum, good writing.

 

 

Content Marketing

Content marketing combines good, focused writing — as described above — and strategic distribution. It’s most effective when your articles, news, white papers, etc. get  placed on “high authority” sites, such as major media sites (Yahoo News, Google News, etc.) and  industry sites (HR Executive, Healthcare Infomatics, TechCrunch, Industry Week, etc.), as well as broadly distributed via social media.  

“Ultimately, content marketing is only as effective as the quality and relevance of your writing. As specialists in technology, healthcare and HR, we know the dominant issues, trends and needs in each of these markets, and, consequently, how to craft informed and timely communications that resonate with editors and readers,” said BackBone’s Charles Epstein. “Algorithms change. Quality writing is quality writing, which is the one constant you can control. It is the foundation of all successful content marketing initiatives.”

This is not to simplify how difficult it is to get discovered, particularly when you’re competing with better known, more established companies who are all vying for a reporter or reader’s limited time and attention.

But in our experience you’re better served focusing more on the relevance, timeliness,   coherence, even the invention and wit of your writing — ok, content — than trying to divine Google’s latest search engine algorithms. And remember: it’s just as important to have something to say and insights to share once people find you. Better SEO might have gotten Hemingway more readers, but it wouldn’t have gotten more people to pay attention.

“Find the best writers, pay them to write, and avoid typos at all costs.” If Hemingway were writing today, he’d probably also urge you to avoid too many keywords. Not sure what he would have said about adding back links to A Moveable Feast.

 

 

A Public Relations Primer: How the Sausage Gets Made

No one really knows how the game is played
The art of the trade
How the sausage gets made
We just assume that it happens

The Room Where it Happened, from Hamilton 

(First in a series taking readers inside the practice of Public Relations and the various ways in which companies can use it to establish thought leadership, raise awareness, establish credibility in the marketplace – which is particularly key for emerging companies with little or no name recognition or even reference-able clients – and support, even drive sales.)

Public relations (PR) is often misunderstood, when it is even understood at all — ironically, it is public relations itself that could use better PR. To some, public relations, or “spin,” is synonymous with propaganda, but effective PR aims to establish credibility. It is not about “spinning” or obfuscating or misleading; it is about framing information or, if you will, shaping a narrative that tells your story in the most compelling manner possible in order to deliver a message that gets attention and leaves the desired impression.

PR Best Practices

PR is about standing out by being timely, provocative, counter-intuitive.

The “mechanics” of media relations — reaching and connecting with the media–require persistence and the ability to tailor a message in such a way that it stands out from the dozens, even hundreds of story pitches the average editor receives on a weekly basis. The competition for an editor’s attention is fierce, so it’s critical that your story sound compelling, have a unique angle, and be timely, perhaps by relating to an emerging trend or a new study or item in the news. The query (another name for the story “pitch”) must communicate its value quickly, since editors typically read the subject of the query and the lead sentence to determine if the proposal is worth pursuing.

Grabbing a busy editor’s attention when you have about 35-50 words to do the job is a pretty stiff challenge. So, too, is sustaining a steady drumbeat of company communications, which is an important (indeed, indispensable) part of raising broad awareness (in fact, this applies to media relations just as it does for communications directed at management and end-users). However, if your goal is to spark editorial interest that leads to an interview and/or story, you need to be selective in discerning what is truly newsworthy.

On any given day, editors are bombarded with hundreds of press releases and pitches that vie for their attention. Ultimately, a press release or query will either be lost in the daily avalanche of emails or land a coveted spot on a publication’s editorial calendar as the focus of a feature story, the topic of a product review, or the subject of an interview with an “expert source.”

But how, exactly, do you get editors to sit up and take notice of your message? You need to put the “news” in a news release by providing editors with timely and targeted information they can use to fulfill their obligation to their readership to deliver relevant and practical articles that help them succeed.

Held to this standard, many press releases are not newsworthy. Consider the news release that announces the appointment of a key individual in a company. In all likelihood, the announcement will be relegated to the back pages of a publication, grouped with other similar items.

So, why bother sending it out? Because you have to keep your eye on the big picture. Press releases serve to boost company recognition among your target audience: editors. You need to build and maintain awareness of your company and its products and/or services. In other words, you need to make sure that media contacts know you’re a “player.”

Consistency

Consistent communications is the building block of every PR campaign. In addition, each press release should serve as a jumping-off point–a channel to offer to arrange an interview, send additional information, or schedule a product demonstration.

Successful public relations does not happen overnight; it’s a process of building relationships over time. Editors need to know they can depend on you to consistently deliver a bylined article or an expert source to comment on an industry trend. They need to know you’re always on time and on target. Simply put, an effective media relations program or approach will: establish and enhance your reputation; affirm your company’s authority in its given industry or field; profile your company’s brand, services, and/or products among target audiences; create new business opportunities; improve staff morale; and promote sales.